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    • For Professional Baseball Players, Faster Hand-Eye Coordination Linked to Batting Performance

      Published Jul 17 2018, 11:23 AM by Wolters Kluwer Health
      • Optometry and Vision Science

      Professional baseball players who score higher on a test of hand-eye coordination have better batting performance – particularly in drawing walks and other measures of "plate discipline," reports a study in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

    • Most Glaucoma Patients Don't Ask About Medication Costs

      Published Dec 01 2017, 01:30 AM by Wolters Kluwer Health
      • Optometry and Vision Science

      Less than one-third of patients with glaucoma talk to their doctor about the costs of medications needed to control their disease, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

    • How Long Do Batters 'Keep Their Eye on the Ball'? Eye and Head Movements Differ When Swinging or Taking a Pitch

      Published Aug 03 2017, 02:30 AM by Wolters Kluwer Health
      • Optometry and Vision Science

      Where are baseball batters looking during the fraction of a second when a pitched ball is in their air? Their visual tracking strategies differ depending on whether they're swinging at the pitch, reports a study in the August issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

    • 'Substance P' in Tears—A Noninvasive Test for Diabetes-Related Nerve Damage?

      Published Jul 06 2017, 02:30 AM by Wolters Kluwer Health
      • Optometry and Vision Science

      Levels of a nerve cell signaling molecule called substance P—measured in tear samples—might be a useful marker of diabetes-related nerve damage (neuropathy), suggests a study in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

    • Are Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Children? Risks Seem No Higher than in Adults

      Published Jun 02 2017, 02:30 AM by Wolters Kluwer Health
      • Optometry and Vision Science

      Available evidence suggests that soft contact lenses can be safely prescribed to children and adolescents, with no increase in adverse effects compared to adults, according to a review in the June issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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